my 6 favorite free patterns on ravelry

These are my 6 favorite patterns from ravelry, a fantastic treasure trove of a site! You’ll notice that these are all baby-things and accessories, which are fairly quick and doesn’t use a ton of yarn, and those are things that makes me happy with a project. Instant gratification! And maybe some last-minute Christmas-gifts? Well, here they are:

Aviatrix baby hat

Aviatrix baby hat

This is a great little baby-hat. It is a quick knit, with adorable details, and clever construction. All the shaping is done with short-rows, and there is no seaming! I wouldn’t recommend it for the complete novice however, not just because of the short rows, but also because the pattern covers a large range of sizes and yarnweights and can be a little cryptic to decipher.

my ravelry project page | the pattern

Baby Sophisticate

Baby Sophisticate

I *love* this little baby-cardigan. It’s worked top down, with the collar and front button-band worked last (and easily in one single piece). It’s cute, and pretty easy, and.. did I say cute?

my ravelry project page | the pattern

Shifting sands

Shifting sands scarf

This, however, was anything but quick. Not in a bad way, just the slow-and-steady kind. I also used a thin yarn, which made all the cables tiny. Yes, those are hundreds, maybe thousands of cables. But they’re not hard! And this scarf has about the loveliest texture I’ve ever seen.

my blog post | my ravelry project page | the pattern

Robin’s egg blue hat

Robin's Egg Blue Hat

Another quick knit, with a seed stitch brim, and decorative flap with button. This really was fast, and would make a good, easy gift-knit. Check out the pictures of all the hats on the pattern page!

 my ravelry project page | the pattern

Pebble vest

Pebble vest

So cute I can almost not stand it! I haven’t seen this in action, but the buttons on the side and on one of the straps apparently makes it easy to get on and off little wriggling babies. The garter stitch and stockinette stitch combination is lovely, and outside of sewing on buttons, there is only one seam to join!

my blog post | my ravelry project page | the pattern

Cabled watchcap

Part of why I like this hat is the very soft, very fine yarn that I used, but most of all it’s the pattern. It has cables of two different sizes, and the repititon of the cables against the purl background is enough to make it feel interesting, instead of overly symmetrical. It’s just plain pretty!

my blog post | my ravelry project page | the pattern

Shamelessly promoting my own free patterns:

Reversible biking hat

My first attempt at writing a sharing a knitting pattern! It’s a lightweight hat with eyelets, it’s reversible, and pretty easy. I called it a biking hat because John (that’s him in the picture) said it’d be perfect underneath a cycling helmet in the colder months. I’m at three hats made from this pattern now – I’m sure there will be more!

my blog post | my ravelry project page | the pattern

Elvish leaves scarf

And my second free pattern, a lace scarf in fingering weight wool. It has an elegant leaf pattern repeat, and makes for a good intermediate lace project. The thin scarf is perfect for slightly chilly days where you just need that extra little warmth and comfort around your neck!

my blog post | my ravelry project page | the pattern

reversible biking hat – alterations

The autumn hat I shared recently is one I based on my pattern The Reversible Biking hat. I’ve made a few of them now, so knowing the pattern pretty well, I wanted to change it up a bit. And altering knitting patterns to fit your own needs really isn’t that hard! Here is what I did/what you can do:

First, I used a different yarn, which usually means a different gauge. The gauge in the original pattern is 24 stitches per 4 inches, or 6 stitches per inch. My gauge for this new yarn was around 17 per 4 inches, or 4,3 stitches per inch. How many stitches do I need to cast on to make the same size? (hmm, I sound like a math book problem!)

The circumference of the hat is 18 inches, and with 4.3 stitches to the inch of my gauge, I simply multiply the goal number of inches with the amount of stitches per inch my gauge is:

18 x 4,3 = 77,4 (≈78)
goal # of inches x your stitches pr inch = amount to cast on.

At this point, you might have to make some adjustments to your cast on number. If there is a repeat pattern, the number for your cast on has to be a multiple of that. In this case, the repeat pattern I used is 6 (p1, k5), and 78 is divisible by 6, so I’m all set. Alternatively, if you have a cuff or a brim, you can adjust the number of stitches up or down in the first round after the cuff.

reversible biking hat

Another thing I did to change the look of this hat, was to stagger the 5-row repeats and create diagonal lines instead of straight lines. This is also quite simple; at the first round of the repeated section, knit the first stitch, then do the section as normal. You’ve effectively just nudged the pattern over by one stitch, and when you keep nudging at the beginning of every repeat, you get diagonal lines!

Reversible biking hat

When you tweak the number of stitches, one thing is to be aware of the stitches in each repeat. The other is to be mindful of the decreasing. The Reversible Biking Hat is pretty simple in how it decreases, so the major thing to consider here is that I have an odd number of repeats (13) instead of an even number of repeats (24) like the original has. This means that while most knit stitches in the very last row corresponds to two whole sections, there is one left over that corresponds to the last, thirtheenth section. That is ok – you can cut the tail and loop through the rest of the stitches that turns out to be 14, instead of 12.

The more intricate the pattern and the decrease design, and the longer the repeat is, the harder it is to substitue numbers. But for relative simple designs like this one, all you need is a little math!

If you have any questions, or if something was unclear, do please ask!

a sweater, two hats, and a pattern of sorts

The first  sweater I successfully frogged, or recycled for it’s yarn, was a charcoal wool/cotton blend Eddie Bauer specimen:

Even after knitting an entire new sweater for the boy, there was still a whole lot of yarn left. It was like an endless supply! Alongside the seamless sweater, there now exists an almost finished scarf, a baby-hat, a pair of socks, and,two adult-sized hats from this one original sweater.

The first of the hats I made, was the Butterfly beret by Rachel Iufer (ravelry link here). My Eddie Bauer yarn was thinner than what the pattern called for, so I ended up adding some repeats, both in width and length, to get the right size. The butterfly stitch is very clever, and it was an enjoyable and fairly easy knit. This is a gift for a friend, so hopefully she’ll be equally as happy with the hat as I am!

And now for something kind of exciting. I knitted a second hat, and this one I concocted the pattern for all by myself. This isn’t terribly unusual or noteworthy – a lot of my projects involve making things up as I go, and re-doing until I satisfied. What is exciting is that after knitting this self-composed hat twice, I’ve decided to write out the directions and publish it as a free pattern! I hope to have it finalized within a couple of days, so keep an eye out for:

the Reversible biking hat!


(ETA: The pattern is now available in this blogpost!)